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Ajuda National Palace

Ajuda National Palace

Ajuda National Palace

Ajuda National Palace (Largo da Ajuda, Lisbon) – this palace, located in central Lisbon was once the permanent residence of Portugal’s royal family, which construction was started in 1795, but never fully completed (due to political turmoil that the country endured during portions of the 19th century – in particular, the Napoleonic invasion of Portugal, which compelled the royal family to go into exile in Brazil in 1807). In 1910, when the Republic was instated, the consequent exile of the royal family brought a closure period upon the palace. It opened to the public as a Museum since 1968.

Visitors can admire the numerous rooms replete and tastefully arranged with furniture, statues, tapestries, porcelain and impressive chandeliers. Highlights refer to the Throne Room (which fills virtually the entire south wing of the edifice), to the Dining Room (which stands out by its wealth of crystal chandeliers, beautifully designed furniture and by the frescoed ceiling), to the Winter Garden (also valuable for its ceiling) and to the Ballroom. A wide collection of clocks is scattered throughout the edifice, but visitors should also take time to study the 23 allegorical statues placed in front of the main entrance.

Admission: Adult (€10), Seniors & Children ages 6-18 (€5), Children up to age 6 (free).
Hours: daily (except Wednesdays) from 10 am to 5 pm.